INFO COURSES

Even if you’re not an informatics minor, our courses can help you.

INFO 102 Little Bits to Big Ideas

4 hours, SPRING ONLY GenEd credit for Quant I

Broad introduction to the nature, capabilities, and limitations of computing. Topics range from the way data is represented and stored, to the way today’s computers work, to the general ideas of algorithms and computational efficiency, to the future of computing. Covers “Great Ideas” across various areas of the field, including, for example, cryptography and internet security, problem solving, modeling and simulation, and artificial intelligence.

CS  105 Intro Computing Non-Tech

3 hours, offered fall and spring, GenEd credit for Quant I, required core course for informatics minor

Computing as an essential tool of academic and professional activities. Functions and interrelationships of computer system components: hardware, systems and applications software, and networks. Widely used application packages such as spreadsheets and databases. Concepts and practice of programming for the solution of simple problems in different application areas. Intended for non-science and non-engineering majors.

CS 101, or CS 125,  or ECE 120/220 can substitute for CS 105.

INFO 199 Undergraduate Open Seminar

Can be used for individual study in a subject related to informatics not covered in normal course offerings. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 undergraduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Application form

INFO 202 Social Aspects of Information Technology

3 hours, offered spring, GenEd credit for Social Sciences, required core course for informatics minor

Explores the way in which information technologies have and are transforming society and how these affect a range of social, political and economic issues from the individual to societal levels.
LIS 202 and MACS 202 are the same as INFO 202.

INFO 303 Writing Across Media

3 hours, GenEd credit for Adv Comp starting Fall 09, offered fall, spring, summer

Media changes not only how we write but what we write-and what we recognize as writing. It is no longer practical to think of writing as simply words on a page. (Maybe it was never practical.) Writing Across Media (WAM) will pay close attention to those points where text and image meet and consider the ways in which writing is shaped by these interactions. A guiding principle of this course is that effective writing cannot take place simply by learning a set of functions or techniques. We will approach multimodal writing from theoretical and practical perspectives. For example, we will consider not only how to create a web site but also why people have chosen to represent their ideas (and themselves) in certain ways.

Some of the questions the course will explore are What are the invisible media forms that we use each day? Is the media the message? What are the implicit rules that govern how we choose to represent our ideas in different media? How can we identify those rules (and challenge them) to produce effective media productions? How can theoretical ideas about new media inform practical training? What does it mean to read visual images? What are the rules that shape how we choose to design and literally position our ideas?

By integrating practical “how-to” guidelines with broader theoretical issues of what it means to write (and read) with different media, we will work on developing effective strategies for creating dynamic web pages, multimodal presentations, videos and other digital projects. Class sessions will be a combination of class discussion and hands-on training. No prior experience is necessary.

INFO 326 New Media, Culture and Society

3 hours (same as MACS 326)

Digital media is an immensely pervasive and powerful form of communication that despite its rapid growth has yet to reach most of the world’s population. This lecture-based survey course for undergraduates traces the history and formation of personal computing and the Internet, the development of virtual communities and virtual worlds, evolving forms of digital representation and communication, digital visual cultures, features of new media industries, and the rise of participatory media. Evaluation and assessment is based on written exams, quizzes, class discussion in section, and practice-based assignments using new media technologies such as wikis, blogs, games, and digital video. Emphasis is on mastering key concepts of digital media through theory and history, and on critical discussion of distinctive features of digital media objects. Lectures and discussion sections are held in computer-equipped classrooms.

INFO 345 Digital and Gender Cultures

3 hours (same as GWS 345, MACS 345, and SOC 345}

This interdisciplinary course uses the lens of gender critique and pairs it with social activism to provide students analytical tools to engage with, reshape, and create digital cultures. Examines recent research and public policies related to the gendered, raced, and classes dimensions of digital cultures and inequality; the broad range of labor issues embedded in the growing income disparity related to digital cultures; the various ways that digital inequality has been defined by public policy, sociologists, and activists, and real examples of collective activism and social change related to emerging technologies.

INFO 390 Special Topics

1-3 hours

Explores a variety of informatics topics. Topics and prerequisites vary by section; see current Class Schedule for details. May be repeated indefinitely in separate terms when taken as different sections.

INFO 399 Individual Study

Individual study in a subject related to informatics not covered in normal course offerings. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit 1 to 3 hours.

INFO 490 Special Topics

1-3 hours

Explores a variety of informatics topics. Topics and prerequisites vary by section; see current Class Schedule for details. May be repeated indefinitely in separate terms when taken as different sections.

INFO 491/591 Bioinformatics Seminar Undergrad Grad

Spring only, 1-2 hours

This course will cover topics of current interest related to bioinformatics, which includes the spectrum of health, biomedical, biological and agricultural informatics, and computational biology. Presentations will be given by faculty members, guest speakers from academia and industry, and students, followed by discussion.

Undergraduates need permission of instructor. Graduates must be enrolled in the MS in Bioinformatics or permission of instructor.

INFO 500 Orientation Seminar

Fall only, 0-2 hours

A broad introduction to faculty research in each program area offered by the Informatics PhD. Consists of weekly presentations by Informatics faculty highlighting their recent research, practice, and related concepts. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 2 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in any field.

INFO 510 Research Practicum

4 hours

A one semester directed research project supervised by a member of the informatics faculty in the student’s area of specialization or closely related area. These are intended to be practical research, not just literature surveys, and must have a definite output such as a paper or demonstration project. The research should be relevant to the thesis work or preparatory work to support the thesis. Informatics students must take two semesters, usually each semester should be under a different Informatics faculty member, but with the concurrence of their advising committee both may be taken under a single faculty member. Approved for S/U grading only. May be repeated in separate terms to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in any Informatics and permission of instructor.

INFO 597 Individual Study

2 to 4 hours

Individual study in a subject related to informatics not covered in normal course offerings. May be repeated in same term for a maximum of 8 hours or separate terms for a maximum of 16 hours if topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

INFO 599 Thesis Research

0-16 hours

Research for PhD thesis. May be repeated in separate terms. Prerequisite: Instructor approval required.